Bruce Performs Final “This Is It” Recital, Ending 6-Year Project

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Bruce Performs Final “This Is It” Recital, Ending 6-Year Project
by Olivia Drake • April 2, 2019

After publicly performing almost 16 hours of his solo piano compositions, Neely Bruce, the John Spencer Camp Professor of Music played his final concert on March 31, concluding a six-year project.

Bruce, who took up piano at the age of 8, began the series titled “This Is It! The Complete Piano Works of Neely Bruce” in 2013. He performed a total of 17 CD-length recitals at Crowell Concert Hall during this time.

“I thought it might take 12 (recitals), but it ended up being 17,” Bruce said. “This was a great opportunity to take stock of my whole life as a composer for the keyboard.”

Bruce has composed more than 300 original songs in addition to three full-length operas; five one-act operas; works for orchestra, chamber orchestra, and wind ensemble; chamber music; electronic music; and documentary film scores. He also set the Bill of Rights to music. Read more about his work on neelybruce.com.

“I never set out to be a composer of such an extensive oeuvre for piano,” he said.

This spring, Bruce is teaching 18th-Century Counterpoint and Music of the 19th Century.

In March, the Center for the Arts Radio Hour featured a conversation between Neely Bruce and composer, scriptwriter, and essayist Michael Kowalski. They discussed many aspects of the oeuvre—how Bruce writes for the instrument, the stylistic diversity of the pieces, his indebtedness to other composers, and more. The conversation also includes performances of Bruce’s “The Feline Sea”; “Playful Edge of the Wave: Image-Based Music for Solo Piano” (Ravello Records); and “Pandiatonic Study No. 3.”…

Mauro memorial part of new music in 45th anniversary concert by Orchestra New England

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Mauro memorial part of new music in 45th anniversary concert by Orchestra New England
By Joe Amarante
March 4, 2019

Orchestra New England’s 45th ambitious anniversary (or birthday, if you will) will be marked in a concert March 9 amid a season that follows the profound loss of the organization’s (Mary) Anne Mauro.

Mauro, who died in September 2018, “was everything to Orchestra New England — its driving spirit,” said maestro James Sinclair, “as a director, fundraiser, event planner, organizer, decorator, hostess and creative thinker.”

ONE’s 45th-year event — its 781st concert and featuring its 71st-73rd musical premieres, will include a memorial piece honoring Mauro. The concert will take place in Battell Chapel in New Haven. Former members of the orchestra have been invited to join the current orchestra members for festivities in New Haven…